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Posts from the ‘Living Benefits’ Category

Long Term Care Insurance – Not Just for the Elderly

Whenever the topic of Long Term Care Insurance (LTC) is brought up, most people’s reaction is to automatically assume the discussion is about caring for the elderly.   While it is true that LTC coverage is a valuable tool to provide the necessary funds for when we are no longer able to care for ourselves, it should not be overlooked for younger people who are in the prime of their earning years but are unable to purchase the amount of disability insurance that they desire.

LTC insurance pays a monthly benefit to an insured who is unable to perform at least two of the six activities of daily living without assistance.  The activities of daily living are bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (bed to chair or vice-versa), continence and eating.  It also pays a benefit in the case of cognitive impairment.  Anyone who has been in a serious accident, took a bad fall on the ski slopes, or suffered a debilitating illness or condition could probably have received a benefit from a LTC insurance policy if the condition lasted longer than the waiting period of the contract. Read more »

Start a family conversation about elder care

By David Wm. Brown and Sarah Brown

Starting a conversation about someone’s age is a sure way to be the least popular person in the room. But while this is a no-go territory for cocktail party chatter, it’s a conversation you need to have with your parents.

Statistics Canada tells us that in 2007, people aged 45 to 64 paid for 75% of elder care. And now, a new generation is realizing that when their parents need long-term care, they’ll be called upon to fund it.

Read more

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Juvenile Critical Illness with Return of Premium

Protection if you need it.  A refund if you don’t.

Critical Illness Insurance – Not Just for Adults

Most of us have experienced or known someone whose family has been greatly impacted by a parent being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease or condition.  But what about when it happens to children?  Sadly, all too often children are affected by childhood diseases such as:

  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Muscular dystrophy

Read more »

Five Financial Products You Should Own

By Brenda Spiering, Marketing & Communications Manager, Client Solutions, for Sun Life Financial.

1. Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)

As soon as you begin your working life, you should have a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP). It’s one of the most tax-effective ways to save for retirement.

You’re allowed to contribute up to 18% of your earned income from the previous year to a maximum of $24,930 for 2015 and $25,370 for 2016. (If you’re a member of a group pension plan, your contribution room is reduced by your “pension adjustment,” an amount you’ll find listed on your T4.)

Contributions are tax deductible, meaning you can net a tidy tax refund while building your savings. Plus, you can turbo-charge your RRSP savings by putting that tax refund back into your RRSP as soon as you receive your cheque. Read more »