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Posts from the ‘Investing’ Category

Index Funds vs Actively Managed Funds: what are the main differences?

There are significant differences when it comes to Index Funds and Actively Managed Funds. Deciding between the two will depend on various factors including your risk appetite, the ROI you are looking to achieve and the timeframe in which you are looking to achieve this. When weighing up these factors it’s useful to know what each type of fund entails, what the main strengths are as well as some of the potential drawbacks of investing in them.

Index Funds

An index fund (also known as a Tracker Fund) is based on a particular market index and aims to track that specific index as closely as possible. The most recognized of these indices are possibly Standard & Poor’s 500 Index, consisting of 500 of the largest US companies that’s listed on the NYSE. Read more

Why an advisor makes a difference in net returns over DIY investors

It’s a common question in recent times, especially in an age when technology and algorithms can make decisions at a fraction of the cost. Is it worth it to hire a financial advisor? Or is it better to save the fees and go for a DIY strategy?

It depends who you ask but there are many – often not so obvious – factors that could make a difference to your net returns when putting your trust in a financial advisor.

Proper financial planning goes beyond how and where you invest. Good financial planning can increase your standard of living throughout your life.

Even for a complete novice it is possible to start investing in products without the help of professionals. The problem with this option is the lack of knowledge. Knowledge is crucial when it comes to investing. Read more »

Supporting adult children takes its toll on boomers’ retirement plans: survey

As baby boomers approach retirement while their children look for financial help, many are feeling the financial strain.

A new TD survey found 62 per cent of boomers can’t save enough for retirement because they’re supporting adult children or grandchildren. Those kids, however, aren’t taking that money obliviously: 44 per cent of millennials who rely on their parents’ or grandparents’ support said they know that help means fewer retirement savings, and 43 per cent said they’d cut costs rather than asking for financial help.

Read: Canadians postpone retirement to support children

“As a parent or grandparent it’s natural to want to help our kids and grandkids who may be facing financial challenges such as finding full-time employment or paying their day-to-day expenses,” Rowena Chan, senior vice-president at TD Wealth Financial Planning, said in a news release. “It’s important that this desire to help is balanced with the goals you have when it comes to retirement.” Read more »

Make the Most of Your Registered Retirement Savings Plan

The Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contribution deadline is  March 1, 2017. Here are some facts about RRSPs to help you make the most of this great opportunity to grow your retirement savings, better plan your personal taxes, and enjoy a comfortable retirement.

Make your maximum contribution

Your RRSP contributions provide a deduction from your taxable income, which for most, results in a tax refund when you file your personal tax return.

For 2017, you can contribute a maximum of 18% of your earned income in 2016, to a maximum of $25,370. Refer to your 2015 notice of assessment as you may have additional unused carry forward limit.  

This number will be adjusted if you are a member of pension plans and/or profit sharing plans, depending on the value of your benefits in the previous year.

Making the maximum contribution at the beginning of each year will add additional compounding power to your RRSP. Read more »